WHAT IF ?

We have heard thousands of questions, and chosen to provide you with the answers to some of the more unusual circumstances and  questions when you're faced with a situation you didn't expect to be in.

-

-


- What should I do if the death occurs in the middle of the night or on the weekend?
We are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. All you need to do is place a call to us at (847) 635-5900. If you request immediate assistance, one of our professionals will be there within the hour. If the family wishes to spend a short time with their loved one to say good bye, let us know and we will arrive when the time is right for you.

- What should I do if a death occurs while away from home?
We can assist you if a death occurs anywhere on the globe. Contact us and we will help guide you through all the arrangements to transport your loved one back to their home. 

- What is the purpose of embalming?

Embalming sanitizes and preserves the body, retards the decomposition process, and enhances the appearance of a body disfigured by traumatic death or illness. It makes it possible to lengthen the time between death and the final disposition, thus allowing family members time to arrange and participate in the type of service most comforting to them. Embalming the body enables mourners to view the deceased if they wish. The emotional benefits of viewing the deceased are enormous, particularly to those having difficulty dealing with the death.

- Is embalming mandatory by law?
No. But, certain factors of time, health and possible legal requirements might make embalming either appropriate or necessary. Please note that embalming may be required if the deceased is being transported by air to another country where local laws need be observed.


- Is it possible to have a traditional funeral if someone dies of AIDS or an infectious disease?

Yes, a person who dies of an AIDS-related illness or other approved CDC guidelines is entitled to the same service options afforded to anyone else. If public viewing is consistent with local or personal customs, that option is encouraged. Touching the deceased's face or hands is perfectly safe. Because the grief experienced by survivors may include a variety of feelings, survivors may need even more support than survivors of non-AIDS-related deaths.

-


-